BESIDE magazine pitch, sample gallery

GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND THE TYPES OF PROJECTS I WORK ON

These photos are from various projects, some personal, some editorial assignments, some from community based research projects in affiliation with universities and NGOs. I’m not content with simply shooting to make ‘content’, I strive to work on projects that have meaningful goals and outcomes. Whether I am pursuing imagery for a long-term project, or just out and about in the world, I keep my eyes peeled and a camera primed. Strong colour, impactful compositions, and a pinch of irony are standards in my work. My relaxed and approachable demeanour allows for intimate portraiture and interesting encounters with a wide variety of people from all walks of life.


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Double Exposures of Haisla Nation Hereditary Chief and master carver Sammy Robinson, and Marcia Dyck, Zero Waster

Made on 4x5 negative sheet film and a field camera from the 70’s, this double exposure of Haisla Nation Hereditary Chief and master carver Sammy Robinson in full regalia against backdrop of traditional Haisla territory is part of a photo essay featured in Arno Kopecky’s award-winning book The Oil Man and the Sea (Douglas & McIntyre, 2013). The body of water depicted in the image is a branch of Douglas Channel, the tumultuous and narrow channel through which super-tankers carrying bitumen would have been routed--had Enbridge’s federally approved but highly contested Northern Gateway project been built. The project, now dead, proved to be a lighting rod of controversy; those living along the route were adamant the project would destroy their livelihoods and cultures, the federal government argued that Canada needs to diversify it’s trading partners and increase revenue from oil and gas exports. Sammy Robinson: “If the creator wanted the Oil Sands, he would have built it here in Kitimaat, he’s the only scientist I’ll ever trust.”

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Originally part of my Master’s thesis project exploring cultural perceptions of land and resource uses, the double exposure of zero-waster Marcia Dyck was recognized by American Photography (ai-ap.com) in their annual celebrating the best of commercial and photojournalistic imagery worldwide in 2013. This creative use of film highlights my dedication and skill in the craft of photography, and showcases my ability to cover subjects and topics that are traditionally journalistic with an arts-based inquiry and approach. I look to Richard Mosse for inspiration; on the use of art where photojournalism usually stands Mosse has said “Beauty is the sharpest tool in the box”.

 


Greenland, editorial for Warren Miller Entertainment

I’m comfortable working in what many consider to be trying conditions. On assignments, at any latitude, I’ve consistently delivered unique imagery that stands out. These examples from Greenland were taken while based on a boat with limited amenities and few comforts. Flexibility and a good sense of humour go a long way when bunking with strangers for weeks at time. 


GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND THE TYPES OF PROJECTS I WORK ON

These photos are from various projects, some personal, some editorial assignments, some from community based research projects in affiliation with universities and NGOs. I’m not content with simply shooting to make ‘content’, I strive to work on projects that have meaningful goals and outcomes. Whether I am pursuing imagery for a long-term project, or just out and about in the world, I keep my eyes peeled and a camera primed. Strong colour, impactful compositions, and a pinch of irony are standards in my work. My relaxed and approachable demeanour allows for intimate portraiture and interesting encounters with a wide variety of people from all walks of life.


Fishmongers of Ghana, an award winning portrait series for Hakai Magazine

Besides sweat and an appreciation for the thumping reggae and Afrobeat rhythms ubiquitous throughout coastal Ghana, I had little in common with these fishmongers and the amicable masses who crowded around while I photographed this series. Whenever we found a willing participant, we quickly transformed the dusty back alleys of bustling fishing villages into makeshift photo sets, complete with the diffusing scrims and large reflectors needed to sculpt the hard light of equatorial Africa. Crowds of locals fanned out behind us to watch. Their voices created an intense and raucous shooting environment as they co-directed, laughed at, and distracted anybody who agreed to pose for the portraits you see here. The coastal dialect of Ga is a series of animated bursts, a gentle and sonorous staccato despite its intense delivery. Their voices—molded by years spent competing with the sounds of wind and sea—were loud. I cannot balance everyday items on my head for transport (machete, desktop computer tower, water), never mind massive amounts of tuna, swordfish, or shark. While I realize capturing this otherness—that of people carrying fish on their heads—in photographs could be construed as cheap voyeurism, this was not my intention; the subjects are intriguing and beautiful—regardless of what they carry on their heads. The result, I believe, honors these women, who, as one viewer remarked, “carry the entire continent on their heads.” This series was also recognised by American Photography in their compilation of the world’s best imagery of 2016.